PRIVATE CHARLES HAROLD BATES; U.S. ARMY

June 26, 1890 (Long Eaton, Erewash Borough, Derbyshire, England) – September 26, 1918; 28 years old; unmarried
Last local address 212 Main Street
Serial number 6414578
79TH INFANTRY DIVISION, 315TH INFANTRY REGIMENT, COMPANY H

Killed in the first days of the Meuse River-Argonne Forest Offensive.

Researching Private Bates was a challenge. Initially he was thought to be Charles Wesley Bates who was born in Norwalk and registered for the draft while living in Chicago. The picture above from The Norwalk Hour provided clues that made it a little easier to find him, specifically through his unit in the Army – 315th Infantry. Using that as the data point, Charles Harold Bates of England was found to be the Charles Bates listed on the plaque in Norwalk. He came to the United States from Canada and after a short residence, enlisted for service with the U.S. Army. In probate records in England, he left his effects to Percy Bates of England, his father. The same record indicated the burial location which matches the picture caption below. Notes on findagrave.com indicate Charles was “a lace maker by trade”. Other people in the World War One section of this web page were British citizens worked at Dresden Lace Works in Norwalk. While Charles Bates’ employment there can’t be confirmed, it is a logical fit to his story. At some point he lived in Philadelphia and also Somerville, New Jersey where he entered the service from. Son of Percy and Hannah Bates. At the time of his death, he had two sisters Mrs. Mary A. Mabbutt and Mrs. Florence N. Porteous, who both lived in Montreal, Canada, and one brother William Bates, lived in North Attleboro, Massachusetts.

Private Bates is buried in the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial, Romagne-sous-Montfaucon, Departement de la Meuse, Lorraine, France; Plot B, Row 5, Grave 17.

Published by jeffd1121

USAF retiree. Veteran advocate. Committed to telling the stories of those who died while in the service of the country during wartime.

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