SERGEANT GEORGE ALLEN LANG; U.S. ARMY

November 7, 1914 (Detroit, MI) – October 20, 2010 (Atlanta, GA); 95 years old
Married Barbara Noack Miller March 15, 1950 in Norwalk, CT
Two daughters Judith and Mary
Last local address: 67 Newtown Avenue, Norwalk
Enlisted on August 1943
Serial number 31338302
28TH INFANTRY DIVISION

Held in German POW camp Stalag 2A Neubrandenburg Mecklenberg 53-13.


From The Norwalk Hour April 22, 1944

Sergeant George A. Lang, with the Rainbow Division at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma, is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Currier Lang of 67 Newtown Avenue, this being his first furlough since he went into the service in August, 1943. Serge3ant Lang has been stationed at Camp Gruber since that time. He is a sharpshooter in rifle and machine gun, and is with a Heavy Machine Gun Squadron. Sergeant Lang was with the Pitney-Bows Postage Meter Company in Stamford for eight years and was an assistant purchasing agent before he went into the Army. He attended Cushing Academy I Ashburnham, Massachusetts and the University of Cincinnati where he majored in engineering. He will return to Oklahoma on Sunday.


From The Norwalk Hour August 18, 1944

Mr. and Mrs. Currier Lang of 78 Newtown Avenue, have received letters from their son, Sergeant George Allen Lang, telling of his safe arrival in England. He says in part: “This country is beautiful and very much more picturesque than I had imagined. Two things that impress me are the cleanliness of the countryside and the relief from all that unsightly advertising that clutters up the American roads. I hope sometime after the war to come back here and travel at leisure and photograph. The Red Cross is surely doing well by us soldier.” Sergeant Lang entered the Army in August 1943, and received his training at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma.


From The Norwalk Hour January 17, 1945

Word was received from the War Department today by Mr. and Mrs. Currier Lang, informing them that their son, Sergeant George A. Lang had been reported as missing in action in Luxembourg on December 20. Sergeant Lang had been overseas since last July and had participated in the march through Paris, the capture of Aachen, and the drive through the Hurtgen Forest with a unit of the First Army. Entering the service in August 1943, Sergeant Lang received his training at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma. He had been employed at the Pitney-Bowes Postage Meter Company in Stamford as an assistant purchasing agent.


From The Norwalk Hour March 9, 1945

A letter received yesterday by Mr. and Mrs. Currier Lang, of 67 Newtown Avenue from their son, Sergeant George A. Lang, sent from a German prison camp, brough much happiness to the family as he had been reported by the War Department as missing in action since December 20, 1944. Sergeant Lang writes that he was located in the front lines of the lightly-held sector in Luxembourg when his division was overrun by Von Rundstedts Big Bulge offensive. The letter was dated January 7, and at that time Sergeant Lang was in a prison camp north of Berlin, about 50 miles from Stettin. Sergeant Lang wrote that “He was all right; receiving boxes from the International Red Cross; and that his health had been good.” Sergeant Lang who was with the Pitney Bowes Postage Meter Company, Stamford, before he went into the service in August 1943, trained at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma. He went overseas in July 1944, participated in the march through Paris, the capture of Aachen and the drive through Hurtgen Forest with a unit of the First Army.


From The Norwalk Hour May 15, 1945

Mr. and Mrs. Currier Lang of 67 Newtown Avenue have received word from their son, Sergeant George Allen Lang who has been a prisoner of war in Germany since December 20, 1944 when he was captured in the Battle of the Bulge, that he has been released from prison camp and expects to return home soon. Sergeant Lang, who was serving with a heavy machine gun unit with the 28th Infantry Division of the Fist Army in Luxembourg when he was taken prisoner, reported that he was “well and safe.” He joined the Army in August 1943, and was sent overseas in August 1944. His father is President of King and Lang Inc., chemical manufacturers.


From The Norwalk Hour July 24, 1945

Members of the Board of Directors of the Norwalk Red Cross met last night at Chapter Headquarters. Presided over by Nelson Rupp, chapter chairman, the meeting opened with the roll call by Mrs. Raymond C. Snell, secretary, which was immediately followed by a talk by Sergeant George Lang, son of Mr. and Mrs. Currier Lang of this city, who has recently returned from overseas. Sergeant Lang agave an extremely lucid and interesting account of his battle experience in France and a particularly graphic story of his months as a prisoner of war in Germany. It is of interest that the Sergeant said, the Germans treated the Americans and the British a little less cruelly than they did the Russian prisoner. He closed his speech by saying “I really don’t believe I would be here tonight had it not been for the Red Cross food packages. They actually kept us alive on the long, forced marches and the hours and days we went in freight cars with nothing but turnip soup and black bread from our captors.” Another interesting point Sergeant Lang brought out was that the Germans had Japanese cooks in back of their battle lines.


Burial information is unknown

Published by jeffd1121

USAF retiree. Veteran advocate. Committed to telling the stories of those who died while in the service of the country during wartime.

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