LANCE CORPORAL JAMES DENNIS SUTTON; U.S. MARINE CORPS

March 4, 1947 (Norwalk, CT) – December 14, 2016 (Redding, CT); 69 years old
Married to Kathryn Schaberg Sutton (1951-) on August 7, 1971 in Norwalk CT
— Divorced in 1983
Married to Noreen Morrow Sutton on June 8, 1991 in Norwalk, CT
Child, James (1981-), and one more (unknown).
Local address: 134 East Rocks Road and 99 Murray Street
Enlisted on June 30, 1967
Serial number (unknown)
Unit: First Marine Division, 1st Recon Battalion, Delta Company

Born to William R. (1922-1975) and Betty Beresh Sutton (1924-present). Siblings are Cheryl (1946-), and three more, unknown.


From The Norwalk Hour August 19, 1968

Lance Corporal J. Dennis Sutton was wounded in action on May 31, 1968 while serving with Delta Company, 1st Recon Battalion, First Marine Division. He suffered a grazing skull wound from an enemy bullet during a firefight in “Happy Valley,” six miles south of Da Nang. He has since been awarded the Purple Heart Medal. Lance Corporal Sutton is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William R. Sutton, 134 East Rocks Road, Norwalk. He enlisted in the U.S. Marines on June 30, 1967 and received his basic training at Paris Island, South Carolina, graduating on September 4th. from there, he went to Camp Lejeune, North Carolina where he completed training in November. After a 20 day leave and a short stay in Reconnaissance School, he was sent to Fort Benning, Georgia where he underwent training with the Army Airborne and qualified as a paratrooper, receiving his silver wings. Lance Corporal Sutton was then sent to “Recon” school at Camp Pendleton, California. On completion of school, and another 20 days of staging training, he was sent to Vietnam on April 20. Upon being wounded, the local marine spent a short time in a hospital in Cam Rahn Bay, and was then sent to Japan for further medical care. Now completely recovered and in Okinawa, Lance Corporal Sutton will return to his unit sometime in late August.


END

Published by jeffd1121

USAF retiree. Veteran advocate. Committed to telling the stories of those who died while in the service of the country during wartime.

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