PRIVATE FIRST CLASS GEORGE CLAYTON YOUNG; U.S. MARINE CORPS

October 3, 1921 (Norwalk, CT) – June 25, 1997 (Norwalk, CT); 75 years old
Married to Katherine Restivo Young (1926-2016) on April 22, 1950 in Norwalk, CT
One child Valerie Young (Gerry) Leone
Address: 5 McKinley Street, Rowayton & 223 East Rocks Road, Norwalk
Enlisted on September 15, 1942 in Springfield, Massachusetts
Discharged on January 12, 1946
Serial number: 459699
Unit: 5th Marine Division, 26th Marines, 1st Battalion, Company A


Born to George E. (1892-1973) and Dorothy G. Stouter Young (1895-1983). One sister, Gwendolyn Mae Young Settanni (1919-2013). George worked as a sheet metal worker at Vought Sikorsky Aircraft prior to the Marine Corps. George Young’s father in law, John Restivo, is also a Purple Heart Medal recipient. His profile can be seen HERE.


Photo contributed by Gerry Leone on March 2, 2022

PFC George Clayton Young

Boot camp at Parris Island South Carolina in the Fall of 1942. Parachute School at Camp Lejeune, New River, North Carolina in January of 1943, then Parachute Battalion, Company A, Camp Lejeune. In the summer of 1943, assigned to the 4th Paratrooper Battalion, Company A, Camp Pendleton, Oceanside California. In January 1944, transferred to the 5th Marine Division, 26th Marines, 1st Battalion, Headquarters Company, Camp Pendleton. After the Battle of Iwo Jima, transferred to Headquarters Battalion, 1st Casualty Company, then discharged in January of 1946.


Wounded in action on February 23, 1945 in the Battle of Iwo Jima. Recipient of the Purple Heart Medal, American Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with one bronze star, Presidential Unit Commendation Ribbon, Navy Occupation Service Medal with Asia Clasp, World War II Victory Medal and the US Marine Cops Marksman Rifle Badge.


PFC George C. Young is buried in St. John’s Cemetery. Plot number is unknown. Picture from findagrave.com.

St. John’s Cemetery, Richards Avenue, Norwalk.

END

Published by jeffd1121

USAF retiree. Veteran advocate. Committed to telling the stories of those who died while in the service of the country during wartime.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: