PRIVATE FIRST CLASS PAUL WILMOT WILBUR; U.S. ARMY

March 15, 1924 (Unknown) – February 2, 1945; 23 years old; unmarried
Last local address: 2 Woodbury Avenue, Norwalk
Enlisted June 24, 1942
Service number: 11072351
124TH CAVALRY REGIMENT, MASS TASK FORCE, F TROOP

Officially “Died of Wounds.”

From The Norwalk Hour February 26, 1945

PFC Paul Wilmot Wilbur, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Wilbur of Woodbury Avenue, died of wounds received in action on February 2 in Burma according to word received yesterday by his parents. PFC Wilbur, 20, enlisted in the Army in June 1942, shortly before he was to have been graduated from Norwalk High School. He trained at Fort Ringgold, Texas, and also at Fort Riley, Kansas. He was sent overseas last June, a member of the 124th Cavalry Regiment attached to the Mars Force in Burma. Besides his parents, he is survived by two sisters, Barbara, and Dawn.

From The Norwalk Hour November 27, 1945

A Norwalk soldier who was killed in Burma died the death of a hero; it was disclosed today in a letter from a buddy who served with him. The fallen hero was PFC Paul Wilmot Wilbur, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Wilbur of 2 Woodbury Avenue, who died on February 2 after he was wounded twice while fighting with the combat cavalrymen to reopen the Burma road. In an unsolicited and moving letter, PFC Albert Z. Sutton, now with the 69th General Hospital on Okinawa, tells the story of how the local soldier, wounded once, declined medical assistance, and knocked out a Jap pillbox, only to be wounded again. PFC Sutton’s letter, dated November 18, was sent to The Norwalk Hour, and reads as follows:

            I know you will be interested in the story of PFC Paul W. Wilbur of your city. PFC Wilbur was killed in action in Burma and is truly one of the unsung heroes of this war. As a member of F Troop, 124th Cavalry, Mass Task Force, Paul Wilbur participated in the campaign to open the Burma road. During the Burma campaign, I was a member of the same unit as Wilbur and as such was a witness to the heroic action in which he met his death. After marching over 300 miles across jungle, swamps, and mountains, F Troop, 124th Cavalry,

ARTICLE CONTINUES ON ANOTHER PAGE THAT IS UNAVAILABLE ONLINE. NEED THE MICROFICHE COLLECTION AT THE LIBRARY TO FIND THE REST.

Private Wilbur is buried in The National Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, HI; Section B, Site 1223

Published by jeffd1121

USAF retiree. Veteran advocate. Committed to telling the stories of those who died while in the service of the country during wartime.

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