PRIVATE FIRST CLASS CHARLES KETRINCHECK; U.S. ARMY

January 10, 1910 (Daisy Town, PA) – June 27, 1959 (Norwalk, CT); 49 years old
Unmarried
Local address: 12 Crescent Terrace and 76 Lexington Avenue
Unit: 88th Infantry Division, 351st Infantry Regiment

Born to Stephen (1884-1962) and Ketrinchek, both born in Hungary. Four brothers Frank (1916-1992), Louis (1911-1997), Albert (1912-1990) and Stephen Jr. One sister, Mary Kertrincheck Mola (1914-2004).

Wounded in the Italian Campaign and awarded the Purple Heart Medal.


During 344 combat days, the 351st advanced from Naples to within 70 miles of the Brenner Pass, covering approximately 585 miles of some of the most rugged terrain in Europe. It accounted for over 40,000 enemy causalities and destroyed large amounts of stores and equipment. Eighteen members of the unit received the Distinguished Service Cross, and there were 650 lesser awards for valor. Over two-thirds of the regiment received the Purple Heart.


From The Norwalk Hour November 9, 1944

PFC Charles Ketrincheck of 118 Lexington Avenue has been cited by the 31st Infantry Regiment, 88th “Blue Devil” Division and awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge for actual participation in combat against the enemy with Lieutenant General Mark W. Clark’s Fifth Army in Italy. Standards for the badge are high. The decoration is awarded to the infantry soldier who has proved his fighting ability in combat. The handsome badge consists of a silver rifle set against a background of infantry blue, enclosed in a silver wreath.


From The Norwalk Hour December 30, 1944

PFC KETRINCHECK WOUNDED IN ACTION

Washington D.C. — PFC Charles Ketrincheck, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Ketrincheck, 118 Lexington Avenue, South Norwalk, has been wounded in action in the Mediterranean area, the War Department announced today.


Buried in St. John’s Cemetery, Richards Avenue, Norwalk. Plot number unknown. Photo pending.


END

Published by jeffd1121

USAF retiree. Veteran advocate. Committed to telling the stories of those who died while in the service of the country during wartime.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: